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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

2 edition of Vegetation and stratigraphy of peatlands in North America. found in the catalog.

Vegetation and stratigraphy of peatlands in North America.

Hugo Osvald

Vegetation and stratigraphy of peatlands in North America.

by Hugo Osvald

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Published by Universitets-biblioteket, distributed by Almqvist & Wiksell in Uppsala, Stockholm .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesActa Universitatis Upsaliensis -- 1
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13795446M

  The objectives of the present paper are to: 1) characterize lake-fill peatlands in Indiana based on the composition and structure of the vegetation of 16 bogs, fens and forested peatlands, 2) investigate the floral, hydrological and seral relationships of the peatlands using canonical correspondence analysis, and 3) compare the peatland flora of Indiana to other peatlands in the . Palynological and geochemical analyses of Holocene lake sediments are used to evaluate long-term interactions between vegetation and soils from four sites in southeastern Labrador, Canada. Canadian Journal of Botany, , 63(3): , The climate of North America and adjacent ocean waters ca. 6 ka. K Gajewski, Robert Vance, M SawadaCited by:

  They are found in peatlands (also called bogs or mires). Peatlands cover about 3% of the earth’s land mass; they are found in the temperate (Northern Europe and America) and tropical regions (South East Asia, South America, South Africa and the Caribbean) 1. Peat soils are classified as histosols. These are soils high in organic matter : Arit Efretuei. Natural community abstract for bog. Michigan Natural Features Inventory, Lansing, MI. 20 pp. Crow, H.A. An ecological analysis of a southern Michigan bog. Michigan Botanist 8: Dansereau, P., and F. Segadas-Vianna. Ecological study of the peat bogs of eastern North America. I. Structure and evolution of vegetation.

The geography of North America is very diverse. Much of the land is covered in thick forests. There are several kinds of forested vegetation zones in North America. One kind is rain forest, which is a dense evergreen forest that receives at least inches of rainfall each year. Deciduous and mixed forests receive less rain and have many trees.   Introduction Peatlands are the world’s most important terrestrial ecosystems with respect to carbon (C) storage, and act as a source and sink for GHGs. In this chapter we outline the importance of peatlands in climate regulation and we describe the effects of drainage and by: 9.


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Vegetation and stratigraphy of peatlands in North America by Hugo Osvald Download PDF EPUB FB2

Vegetation and stratigraphy of peatlands in North America. Uppsala, Vetenskapssocieteten; Stockholm, Almqvist och Wiksell (distr.), (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Hugo Osvald. Vegetation and stratigraphy of peatlands in North America.

Simple search Vegetation and stratigraphy of peatlands in North America. Osvald, Hugo. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology. (English) Book (Other academic) Place, publisher, year, edition, pages.

Purchase Peatlands, Volume 9 - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNCambridge Core - Ecology and Conservation - Peatland Restoration and Ecosystem Services - edited by Aletta Bonn.

The ecosystem with the second most carbon per hectare is the giant conifer forest in the Pacific West of North America, which, before human disturbance, reached only half the carbon density of the average peatland (Joosten and Couwenberg ).

Estimates of soil C stock to 1 m depth range between and Gt C (Smith ).Cited by: 9. with peatlands on National Forests in northeastern Wash-ington, Idaho, and Montana. Also included are descrip-tions of 58 sites representative of the diversity of peatlands present within the study area.

Research needs and conservation tools to protect peatlands are discussed. Acknowledgments The authors thank a number of reviewers for sharingCited by: Detailed stratigraphic descriptions of the peatland were made to analyze its developmental history and determine what factors may be responsible for mat formation.

Stratigraphic data along four transects identified a clay-lined basin with three major sub-bas 14, and 14 m by: Peatland vegetation In boreal and temperate regions, Sphagnum mosses are one of the primary components of peatland vegetation. They play a very important role, as they give peat its valued horticultural properties and form a virtually unbroken cover where other plants may establish and grow.

PEATLAND RESTORATION AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES: AN INTRODUCTION 5 Practice context In practice, there are encouraging signs that these policy signals from the international community are translating into practical action to con-serve and restore peatlands with increasing expertise to restore damaged peatlands across the Size: KB.

Most mire classifications have been developed for peatlands of the northern hemisphere within the boreal and temperate zones where Sphagnum mosses predominate as the principal peat forming species. Detailed classification systems have been developed for Europe, Russia (the former Soviet Union) and North America (especially Canada) that collectively make up about 90% of the global area of peatlands.

peatlands to functional ecosystems. Many peatlands in Europe and North America are abandoned today after decades of mining. Prior to peat harvest, ditches are dug to drain the site.

The surface vegetation is then removed, and the peat deposit is harvested by hand using shovels, or mechanically by tractor-drawn vacuum machines. In recent decades, GPR has been used to determine peat thickness in various locations (e.g.

Doolittle & CollinsSheng et al. Comas et al. a, bComas & SlaterHolden. Direct human impact on peatlands (2 chapters). There are 54 authors and, for a volume produced under predominantly North American editorship, their geographical distribution is rather interesting. Most are from the UK (13) and elsewhere in western Europe (23), eight from Argentina, eight from North America and two from Australasia.

Conclusions. Zonobiome VIII is a mosaic of lakes, upland evergreen and deciduous forest, and peatlands. Most of the world’s peat-forming ecosystems occur in the boreal zone where they play important roles in carbon sequestration, erosional control, and landscape by: ).

Simply put, northern peatlands are mossy, spongy habi-tats. One walks on a soft carpet of vegetation, although it can be through dense black spruce thickets.

In a nonpeatland wet-land, a person will most likely get muddy feet. Hydrology The form and function of fens and bogs are strongly related toCited by: 8. Vegetation patterns in peatlands suggest autogenic peatland development and hydrological processes are controlling factors in peatland evolution.

These processes regulate vegetation ordination by influencing pH and nutrient availability at the peat by: Summaries of the major features of the geology of North America and the adjacent oceanic regions are presented. Twenty chapters include concise reviews of current thinking about Precambrian basement, Phanerozoic orogens, cratonic basins, passive-margin geology of the Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions, marine and terrestrial geology of the Caribbean region, marine geology of the North Atlantic.

At that time, they reorganized the curriculum and did away with the course as a geology major requirement. In about the late 80s, a book titled "Regional Stratigraphy of North America" by William J.

Frazier and David R. Schwimmer was published by Plenum Press. It's the same book as illustrated here, except this one is listed as by by: Releves have been widely used in Europe for vegetation description and classification and increasingly are being adopted for vegetation study in North America.

The DNR maintains a database containing electronic versions of releves and other very similar kinds of vegetation plot data collected across Minnesota beginning in the s.

A regional survey of 60 raised bogs was made in eastern North America to determine the geographic patterns of bog landforms and gross peat stratigraphy. Three major types of bogs were identified: (Cited by:. Additionally, the plants grew under what were apparently such luxuriant conditions that peat and, therefore, coal beds developed in large amounts over vast areas in the northern hemisphere, particularly.

Continental masses we now recognize as North America, Europe, and Russia lay at the ancient equator (Scotese, ). The sense one gets from.Article 7: Hydraulic modelling for assessment of the performance of sedimentation basins downstream from extracted peatlands by S.

Hafdhi, S. Duchesne, A. St-Hilaire Published online: ; Article 8: Paludiculture on former bog grassland: Profitability of Sphagnum farming in North West Germany.Department of Geography University of Toronto Abstract Pollen assemblages, peat humification and carbon:nitrogen stratigraphy were examined at high resolution in a core from a fen peatland in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Northern Ontario, to interpret the factors that drive long-term peatland dynamics.

Subtle changes in the vegetation.